Vital Update On Melanoma Treatment Guidelines For All Dermatologists

 

In the last months of 2018, the American Academy of Dermatology completed a review of their treatment guidelines for several types of melanoma, such as primary cutaneous melanoma. The review prompted a general update to the guidelines in question, and it’s important that any practicing, clinical dermatologists and any at-risk individuals keep themselves up to date on the new information.

The first founding of their review is that surgery and the physical removal of afflicted tissue is to be the first response for primary cutaneous melanoma, regardless of thickness and size of the afflicted area. It’s advised that circumference of the incision should be between one and two centimeters wider than the tumor, but that it may be smaller if the situation necessitates when dealing with primary cutaneous melanoma.

When dealing with melanoma in situ, a condition in which cancer cells only afflict the top layer of skin (also known as stage 0 melanoma or pre cancer), surgical excision is still the first treatment that should be used to solve the disorder. More narrow excision is recommended, with a wide excision of 0.5 to 1.0 centimeters around the cancerous tissue. Melanoma in situ should also be examined via the micrographic surgery debulking specimen, to appropriately stage cancer development and predict potential growths.

Before excising the tumor, it’s advised that a doctor should perform a biopsy of the lymph nodes; ideally, immediately beforehand in the same operative setting.

In his long career as CEO of Treasure Coast MD of Dermatology, Tim Ioannides has treated conditions such as melanoma many times. He has diligently served his patients in curing disorders ranging from cosmetic to life threatening, and will undoubtedly continue to do so for the remainder of his life. Refer to This Article for additional information.

Tim Ioannides also plays an important role in educating future dermatologists in dermatologic surgery and reconstructive surgery as a Voluntary Associate Professor at the University of Miami School of Medicine.

 

See also: http://www.tcdermatology.com/physicians/